Effect of roasting on the nutritional and anti-nutritional properties of Jackbean (Canavalia ensiformis)

Published In: Journal of Underutilized Legumes
Article Link: https://sulegumes.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/JUL11112-121-Odedeji-et-al.pdf
Author(s): Odedeji, J. O., Akande, E. A., Fapojuwo, O. O. and Olawuyi, O. J.

Effect of roasting on the nutritional and anti-nutritional properties of Jackbean (Canavalia ensiformis)
Photo Illustration: Effect of roasting on the nutritional and anti-nutritional properties of Jackbean (Canavalia ensiformis)
Photo Credit
: Sowexotic

This research on the effect of roasting on the nutritional and anti-nutritional properties of Jackbean (Canavalia ensiformis) was conducted by Odedeji, J. O. (of Food Technology Department, Osun State Polytechnic, Iree. Osun State, Nigeria), Akande, E. A. (of Food Science and Engineering, Ladoke Akintola University of Technology, Ogbomosho. Oyo State, Nigeria), Fapojuwo, O. O. (of Food Science and Engineering, Ladoke Akintola University of Technology, Ogbomosho. Oyo State, Nigeria) and Olawuyi, O. J. (of the Department of Botany, Genetics and Molecular Biology, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria.)

The researchers posited that Jackbean (Canavalia ensiformis) is an underutilized legume though with high nutritional value. Prolonged cooking time, tough testa and presence of anti-nutrients have been the militating factors hampering its consumption in Nigeria.

In conducting the study, Jackbean were obtained from the International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Ibadan. The beans were sorted, dehulled and subjected to roasting at 160 0C for (10-50 min). The beans were thereafter milled into flour (1µm) and analyzed for nutritional and anti-nutritional factors.

The researchers reported that roasting had a reducing effect on the moisture and crude fibre contents (7.57 ± 1.90 – 5.07 ± 0.11%) and (5.01 ± 0.33 – 4.43 ± 0.02%) respectively of the beans. However, incremental effect was recorded for fat, ash and carbohydrate contents: (3.83 ± 0.06 – 4.45 ± 0.05%), (4.39 ± 0.17 – 4.72 ± 0.08%) and (46.29 ± 0.63 – 49.43 ± 0.07%) respectively.

They also observed that the highest protein (34.17 ± 0.15%) content was recorded upon roasting at 160 0C for 40 min. And that anti-nutritional factor analyzes showed that roasting had a reducing effect on phenolic (2.52 ± 0.06 – 1.98 ± 0.04 mg/g), tannin (1.67 ± 0.08 – 0.86 ± 0.02 mg/g), oxalate (0.08 ± 0.01 – 0.05 ± 0.02 mg/g), trypsin inhibitor (29.10 ± 0.01 – 18.15 ± 0.08 mg/g) while slight incremental effect was recorded for phytate (0.15 ± 0.01 – 0.36 ± 0.01 mg/g) and saponin (0.53 ± 0.03 – 0.85 ± 0.07 mg/g).

The researchers, therefore, concluded that the study revealed that roasting improved the bioavailability of significant percentage of proximate constituents of jackbean and reduced major anti-nutritional factors. In layman terms, the study revealed that roasting reduced the anti-nutritional while improving the nutritional constituents of Jackbean, therefore making it more edible for consumption.

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