Do climate-smart agricultural practices drive food security of maize farming households in Ogun state, Nigeria?

Published In: Ghana Journal of Science, Technology and Development
Article Link: https://www.gjstd.org/index.php/GJSTD/article/view/267/110
Author(s): Ogheneruemu OBIEGBEDI and Omotade Taofikat OLADAPO

Do climate-smart agricultural practices drive food security of maize farming households in Ogun state, Nigeria?
Photo Illustration: Do climate-smart agricultural practices drive food security of maize farming households in Ogun state, Nigeria?
Photo Credit
: Guardian.ng

This study was carried by Ogheneruemu OBIEGBEDI and Omotade Taofikat OLADAPO both of Department of Agricultural Economics, University of Ibadan, Nigeria on climate-smart agricultural practices and food security of maize farmers in Ogun State, Nigeria.

In simple terms, Climate-Smart Agricultural Practices (CSAP) are farming practices that enable farmers to mitigate the adverse effect of climate change on farm productivity and profitability.

The researchers posited that using multiple Climate-Smart Agricultural Practices (CSAP) have proven to be effective in combating the challenges of climate variability which affect the food security of smallholders, especially cereal farmers.

They argued that limited information exists on CSAP users and food security in Nigeria. Thus, their study was aimed at examining the effect of CSAP on food security among maize farmers in Ogun State, Nigeria.

In conducting the research, the researchers collected primary data from 252 maize farmers with the aid of a well-structured questionnaires through a three-stage sampling procedure. The collected data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, household dietary diversity score, simpson index and ordered logit regression model.

The study’s statistics showed that on average, the maize farmers were 47 years old, had household size of five persons and farm size of 1.8ha. The study revealed that most maize farmers were high users of CSAP (60.00%) and also food insecure (54.15%) due to low dietary diversity score while, 45.85% were food secure due to medium and high dietary diversity.

The researchers noted that the level of CSAP used, positively influenced the probability of being food secure at 5% significance level, alongside age and access to extension agents at 1% level. Being a male maize farmer and household size reduced the probability of food security at 1% level.

The researchers therefore concluded that Climate-Smart Agricultural Practices improved food security among maize farmers and should thus be encouraged. They thereafter recommended that food security programs among farmers should target older farmers and females while increasing access to extension services and enlightenment on birth control measures.

Thank you for reading

Do you have an interesting scholarly paper worth featuring on African Researchers Magazine? Well, we’d love to hear about it. Simply use the ARM Sample Letter to tell us about it.
https://www.africanresearchers.org/downloads/FeaturedArticleRequest.doc

Or would you love to contribute to African Researchers Magazine? We’ll be more than happy to work with you. Simply use the link below to register as an ARM Contributor
https://www.africanresearchers.org/arm-contributors-registration

Thank you for reading